Tag Archives: Case Study

Too much activity in certain areas of the brain is bad for memory and attention

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Summary:Researchers have found that faulty inhibitory neurotransmission and abnormally increased activity in the hippocampus impairs our memory and attention.

Neurons in the brain interact by sending each other chemical messages, so-called neurotransmitters. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the most common inhibitory neurotransmitter, which… Read More

Whiskers help animals sense the direction of the wind

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Summary:Rats use information from their whiskers to localize an airflow source, new research has shown. This discovery could pave the way for the design of novel airflow measurement devices that imitate these biological sensors, say the researchers.

Many animals appear to have an impressive ability to follow the wind to find food, avoid predators, and connect… Read More

Mutually helpful species become competitors in benign environments

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Summary:Nature abounds with examples of mutualistic relationships. Think of bees pollinating flowers whose nectar nourishes the bees. Each species benefits the other, and together their chances of survival are better than if they lived apart. Now scientists have found that such mutualistic relationships aren’t always set in stone. Depending … Read More

New class of fuel cells offer increased flexibility, lower cost

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Summary:A new class of fuel cells based on a newly discovered polymer-based material could bridge the gap between the operating temperature ranges of two existing types of polymer fuel cells, a breakthrough with the potential to accelerate the commercialization of low-cost fuel cells for automotive and stationary applications.

A new class of fuel cells… Read More

Humans have caused climate change for 180 years

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Summary:An international research project has found human activity has been causing global warming for almost two centuries, proving human-induced climate change is not just a 20th century phenomenon.

An international research project has found human activity has been causing global warming for almost two centuries, proving human-induced climate … Read More

Feeling the force between sand grains

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Summary:For the first time, researchers have measured how forces move through 3-D granular materials, determining how this important class of materials might pack and behave in processes throughout nature and industry.

For the first time, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) researchers have measured how forces move through 3D granular materials,… Read More

Whales in the desert ?

Summary:In Cerro Colorado, located in the Ica Desert of Peru, sedimentary sequences dating back nine million years have been found to host the fossil skeletons of hundreds of marine vertebrates. In 2008, remains of a giant raptorial sperm whale, Livyatan melvillei, were discovered at this site. In September 2014, the same international team of researchers… Read More

Forest and watercourse interplay important for restorations

Summary:Humans utilize forests and watercourses in a way that depletes ecosystem habitats, biodiversity and ecosystem services. Many areas are restored to break the trend, but to succeed you need to consider not only the ecosystem in mind, but also surrounding ecosystems.

Humans utilise forests and watercourses in a way that depletes ecosystem habitats,… Read More

35 years on, Voyager’s legacy continues at Saturn

Summary:Saturn, with its alluring rings and numerous moons, has long fascinated stargazers and scientists. After an initial flyby of Pioneer 11 in 1979, humanity got a second, much closer look at this complex planetary system in the early 1980s through the eyes of NASA’s twin Voyager spacecraft.

Saturn, with its alluring rings and numerous moons, … Read More

Reproducing spots and stripes of a furry animal: Understanding nature’s patterns with plasmas

Summary:Patterns abound in nature, from zebra stripes and leopard spots to honeycombs and bands of clouds. Somehow, these patterns form and organize all by themselves. To better understand how, researchers have now created a new device that may allow scientists to study patterns in 3-D like never before.

Patterns abound in nature, from zebra stripes and … Read More

Teachers favor middle-class behaviors by students

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Summary:Sociologists have found that teachers often inadvertently translate students’ class-based behaviors into unequal opportunities in school. Teachers favor middle-class students in various ways, perhaps unconsciously.

Behavior is big in education, said Jessica Calarco, assistant professor of sociology in the College of Arts and Sciences… Read More